Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Found in Commercial Chickens in Missouri

(Canva.com)

USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in a flock of commercial broiler chickens in Stoddard County, Mo.

Samples from the flock were tested at the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, part of the National Animal Health Laboratory Network, and confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, USDA said in a release.

APHIS is working closely with state animal health officials in Missouri on a joint incident response. The affected premises has been quarantined, and birds on the properties will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system, the release said.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the recent HPAI detections do not present an immediate public health concern and no human cases of these viruses have been detected in the U.S. 

As part of existing avian influenza response plans, federal and state partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in areas around the affected flock. APHIS will continue to announce the first case of HPAI in commercial and backyard flocks detected in a state but will not announce subsequent detections in the state.

The U.S. has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations, the agency noted.

Anyone involved with poultry production from the small backyard to the large commercial producer should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. APHIS offers information here.

USDA will report these findings to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) as well as international trading partners. The agency also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern, the release said. 

All cases in commercial and backyard flocks will be listed on the APHIS website.

Read More:

Monitoring Helps Stem Spread of Avian Flu, K-State Expert Says

 

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