What do You Expect for the 2020s?

What changes does the industry need? What changes would you like to see transpire? What changes will we need to accept whether we like them or not?  ( Farm Journal )

We need your input for an article on expected or emerging trends in bovine practice.

During the past decade, we saw numerous changes in beef and dairy production, and in the ways veterinarians serve those industries. These include the emergence of remote monitoring, advanced data systems, new diagnostic tools, genomic technologies, acceleration of antibiotic-resistance in cattle pathogens and drug resistance in cattle parasites. 

Veterinarians have adopted more consultative roles, and spend less time engaged in “fire engine” medicine. Disease prevention, involving animal husbandry, biosecurity, nutrition, vaccination and microbial management has moved to the forefront with an emphasis on antimicrobial stewardship. 

Over just a few years, the ratio of women and men entering bovine practice flipped dramatically. Sustainability has become a key issue across agriculture, while consumer food preferences have shifted toward products from “natural, humane, and climate-friendly” production systems, or toward plant-based protein sources. Global food demand, including that for animal-derived proteins, has continued to grow along with human populations, while availability of agricultural resources including arable land, water, soil nutrients, fuel and labor declines.

Most of these trends will continue through the 2020s, although some will lose steam while others gain momentum. We’ll also see the emergence of new trends, new insights and applications for biology, pharmacology and electronic technologies in animal agriculture, along with changes in regulations, production practices, consumer perceptions and preferences. We’ll need to prepare response strategies for the emergence of foreign or new animal diseases.

While no one can predict every trend, veterinarians serve as forward-looking change agents in animal agriculture, as they continuously evaluate new systems, products, practices and philosophies for potential adoption on their clients’ operations. 

With that in mind, we want your thoughts on the key challenges and opportunities for beef and dairy veterinarians to succeed during the decade of the 2020s. What changes does the industry need? What changes would you like to see transpire? What changes will we need to accept whether we like them or not? 

Categories to address could include, but are not limited to:
•    Client services and communications
•    Data management
•    Medical technology
•    Animal genetics
•    Biotechnology
•    Diagnostic systems
•    Sustainable production systems
•    Animal welfare
•    Biosecurity
•    Antibiotic Stewardship

We want your insights – general or specific, long or short, science-based or imaginative. Please e-mail Bovine Veterinarian editor John Maday with your comments, at [email protected]

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