Have clients check the condition of fans and other cooling equipment.
Have clients check the condition of fans and other cooling equipment.

The Dairy Cattle Reproductive Council says that heat stress robs dairy farmers of $900 million every year in reduced fertility, lost milk production and other health challenges. Traditionally, it was thought that cows began to feel heat stress at 72 degrees F. However, the latest research suggests that a temperature humidity index reading of 68 degrees F. DCRC offers a revised Temperature-Humidity Index chart to reflect this change.

As spring and summer approach, veterinarians can help their producers evaluate their current heat abatement strategies and equipment for better reproduction and milk production during the months when heat stress affects cattle the most.

DCRC says three of the management factors that can be put in place during times of heat stress include:

1. Cooling remains the key component of any heat abatement strategy.

2. Consider alternatives to heat detection.

3. Use A.I. for more breedings.

Click here for more in-depth information on these management factors that can help your clients take the sizzle out of heat stress.